Video Poker Myths and Facts

The machine pays better if you use cold coins. The temperature of the coins doesn’t make any difference to the machine. If some coins from the machine are warmer than others, it is only because the inside of the machine is warmer than the outside air. Incandescent instead of fluorescent bulbs in some machines generate heat. The coins get warm in the hopper but soon cool off in the tray. Whether you play coins dropped from the machine or from a fresh roll purchased is immaterial.

A coin in the slot only starts the selection process. The RNG does not respond to thermal stimuli in any way. The machine you just left was hit by the next player; you should have stuck with it. The random number generator inside the machine is constantly running and it chooses a new hand every 1000th of a second. Only when you insert a coin or press the deal button is the final hand chose. For you to have hit that machine, you would have had to hit the deal button at the exact millisecond that the next player did-a very unlikely possibility. The average person has a reaction time of 50 to 350 seconds but the mechanical switch in the machine takes only 16 to 50 milliseconds. That means that 66 to 400 milliseconds is as close as a person could estimate the right time to play, and, in that time, 66 to 400 different hands could be dealt. Maybe next time you’ll be the one to hit after someone else has left. The micro-processor controls the time, not you or any other player. Playing fast will make the machine pay out more often. The speed at which you play has no direct effect on whether the machine will pay more often. In fact, if you play too fast, you may hit the deal button before your last coin registers. That could not only cost you a coin but also could cost you more money if you happen to hit a payoff without the maximum coins played. Also, if you draw too fast, you might make the wrong choice or accidentally push a hold button twice and cancel out a winning hand. The buttons are usually very sensitive to the touch, but sometimes one or more may not be as easy to push and may not hold. Playing two-handed for speed can be dangerous even if you’re ambidextrous. Sometimes the left hand doesn’t know what the right one is doing and vice versa.

Don’t try to beat the machine at its own speed; you’ll lose. We have seen an old gentleman who frequently plays dollar video poker. He counts, softly but audibly, as fast as he can between plays; and after he inserts his coins, he also presses the deal or draw button as fast as he can. He varies the number of coins he plays, seldom the maximum, but we haven’t been able to hear just whether his count is the same or varied. We’ve never seen him win more than a few coins. He plays only five or six hands before changing machines. His method is fast but futile. He, at best, just spreads his losses around. If someone next to you hits a royal, your machine won’t hit. It would be practically impossible to coordinate or synchronize pay cycles on adjacent machines to hit in any specific order. Besides, the random play each machine receives would upset any such ordered responses, not to mention the various strategies used by different players. This myth, at best, is drawing on the “law of averages” and, at worst, superstition. Speaking of superstition, we devoted a whole chapter in Slot Machine Mania to describing most of those that players believe in or practice faithfully. One machine does not know when another machine is dealing or paying. Only on linked progressive machines are the payout meters linked to reset the progressive jackpot after it is hit. This linkage has no effect on the random number generator in each machine that chooses the deal. (i.e. The bank of machines are not controlled by a single RNG; the machines are still individually controlled.) We’ve seen royals hit side by side within a few seconds or minutes on both individual and progressive machines. Every time they have a drawing, they tighten the machines. How often we’ve heard, “I never win during one of these special promotions.” Why would a casino deliberately try to keep anyone from winning? A new winner is a new customer who will probably return to play again. If you have bad luck during these drawings, it’s probably because someone else was at the right machine at the right time. The casino is happy if all or most of the machines are being played; that is why they hold the drawings-to get more people through the doors.

Changing a machine’s percentage involves substituting the computer chips in the machine and revising the award glass. The time involved to change all or most machines on the floor does not justify the effort for short periods of time. Don’t worry; their hold percentage is all the casinos need to make their profit The hopper is full, I can hear the coins falling into the bucket below; it must be “ready” to hit. A full or empty hopper does not mean the machine is ready to pay. It could have been recently refilled by an attendant after running out of coins on a previous payout or cash-out. As you insert coins into the machine, some of them fall into the hopper and some fall into the “drop” bucket under the machine. If the drop bucket has just been exchanged, you hear the loud noise of the coins hitting the bottom of the bucket. Note: the “drop” bucket is not to be confused with the coin tray or well that catches your coins from the machine when you collect for a winning hand. “This machine is so slow spitting out the coins; it must be a tight one.” The speed or lack thereof with which the machine pays out on a win has nothing to do with the percentage of payback return or whether, in player’s parlance, it is “loose” or “tight.” As machines grow old, some parts have to be replaced, such as coin acceptors, and perhaps the casino is just a bit slow in performing the required maintenance. If the machine is slow-paying, the hopper could also be jammed from a bent coin (sometime a counterfeit coin, a slug, or a foreign coin) or from being too full. It could also happen simply because the hopper is nearly empty.

If it stops paying, the video screen will flash “call attendant.” You will need to push the change button to “light” the candle on top of the machine if it does not automatically flash to alert the change-person or floor-person that there is a problem. “These video poker machines always deal the card I needed on hand too late.” If you made the wrong choice on the draw and on the next hand the machine deals you the cards you would like to have had before, don’t get upset; they most likely would not have been the ones you would have received if you had drawn differently. As we explained in “Understanding the Machine and the Game,” the RNG selects the cards randomly each time from a full deck. If you have heard other myths or have misconceptions that we haven’t described, we hope the information in other chapters will clarify any doubts or reservations you have about the game and your chances of winning.

In conclusion, when it comes to the myths surrounding poker, there are way too many of them out there without taking the aforementioned ones into consideration but still what matters at the end of the day is that it is a level playing field where the best players are the ones that have achieved perfection through hard work and practice by playing Judi Online as a means to get as close to perfecting the technique as possible.